U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

  1. Home
  2. Trade
  3. ACE Export Manifest Implementation Guides

ACE Export Manifest Implementation Guides

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is working to build an electronic export manifest process to eliminate today’s costly and time-consuming paper process. An electronic export manifest enables CBP to better facilitate the movement of compliant shipments and identify potential issues early in the supply chain, enabling the resolution of potential administrative issues before export movement is delayed. Export manifest automation will also enable CBP to electronically communicate shipment exam requirements, helping carriers adjust and plan for the movement and loading of affected shipments.  

Expand the sections below for more information on ACE Export Manifest functionality:

Beginning in March of 2012, CBP allowed CBP Form 1302A Cargo Declaration - Outward with Commercial Forms to be filed using the Document Image System (DIS). The use of DIS was offered as an interim step to the development of a fully electronic export ocean manifest. In 2022, CBP published an extension to the pilot in the Federal Register titled “Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) Export Manifest for Vessel Test: Renewal of Test” (Document Number 2022-08955). Since October 2015, this pilot allowed carriers to submit the export manifest data elements thru the Electronic Data Interface (EDI) to the Automated Cargo Environment (ACE). 

In preparation for the upcoming publication of the National Proposed Rule Making (NPRM) that will announce the proposed regulatory changes for outbound vessel manifest submission, effective October 1, 2022, CBP will disable in DIS the option to submit the CBP Form 1302A Cargo Declaration - Outward with Commercial Forms for outward vessels. Carriers currently utilizing DIS to file this form should begin to transition to either paper submissions or start participation in the ACE Export Manifest Test. As outlined in 19 CFR 4.63, carriers are required to submit the CBP Form 1302A Cargo Declaration - Outward with Commercial Forms to the port of departure. A carrier that is participating in the test and submitting 100% electronic manifest by EDI to ACE will no longer have to submit CBP Form 1302A Cargo Declaration - Outward with Commercial Forms to the port of departure. Participating carriers submitting 100% outbound electronic manifest will be identified in Appendix P of the Electronic Export Manifest Implementation Guides. Carriers submitting 100% outbound electronic manifest can continue to submit Pro forma manifest as outline in 19 CFR 4.75, if authorized by the area port director. 

Questions may be directed to the Outbound Enforcement and Policy Branch, at cbpvesselexportmanifest@cbp.dhs.gov.

CBP is developing the electronic export manifest process by Modes of Transport (MOT), and pilots are now underway for the air, rail, and ocean MOTs. Discussions on implementation of the truck export manifest pilot are still ongoing. For more information on the ongoing export manifest pilots, including information on how to participate, please review the following Federal Register Notices:  

For those participating in the pilots, please refer to the below implementation guides (IG) for the electronic message specifications, organized by MOT. 

The pilots are rolling out at select ports, depending on the trade entities that volunteer for the pilots and their locations around the country. The initial pilot effort is focused on receiving electronic data and returning specific status messages back to trade users. These status messages will include, but are not limited to, the following: 

  • Bill of Lading (BOL) hold message
  • Bill of Lading (BOL) release message 
  • Invalid ITN or ITN exception filing citation 
  • Invalid Port code validations 
  • Invalid in-bond number 
  • ITN on file message 

These messages will be expanded throughout the pilot effort as additional validations and edits are identified. Please refer to the specific MOT IGs below for specifics on the message set anticipated to be supported. 

In the coming years, CBP will work to issue final regulations that require the filing of an electronic export manifest. 

ACE Export Manifest Implementation Guides

The Air Manifest has been coded in the industry standard message set of Cargo-IMP 32nd Edition.  We are currently coding the industry standard message set of Cargo-XML 2nd Edition and will be coding for an Air CAMIR export manifest set.  CBP is also going to code a XML Unified Multi-Modal Manifest Message set for use with all four MOTs.  The industry standard message sets are administered by IATA and are available through them but we have the below guidance specific to CBP data requirements for these message sets.  The Air CAMIR message set is a draft version and a completed document will be posted by April 2015. The FRN announcing the pilot for air is in draft form and is currently being reviewed by CBP.

Air CAMIR

The Ocean Manifest will be coded to the current ANSI X12 message set and the Ocean CAMIR message set.  There is also a Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) posted along with the instructional guidelines on the CBP website.  CBP is also going to code a XML Unified Multi-Modal Manifest Message set for use with all four MOTs.

Ocean CAMIR

Ocean X12

Ocean Export Manifest FAQs

Change Logs

The Rail Manifest will be coded to the industry standard ANSI X12 7010 message set.  CBP is also going to code a XML Unified Multi-Modal Manifest Message set for use with all four MOTs.  The completed message sets are attached.

Rail X12

The Truck export manifest is still being discussed as to how it will be implemented so details will be announced as soon as a decision has been reached.

  • Last Modified: September 28, 2022