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Lapse in Federal Funding Impact on CBP Website Operations Notice

NOTICE: Due to the lapse in federal funding, this website will not be actively managed. This website was last updated on December 21, 2018 and will not be updated until after funding is enacted. As such, information on this website may not be up to date. Transactions submitted via this website might not be processed and we will not be able to respond to inquiries until after appropriations are enacted.

 

Aviso del impacto de la interrupción de fondos federales en las operaciones del sitio web del Oficina de Aduanas y Protección Fronteriza de los Estados Unidos (CBP, por sus siglas en inglés)

AVISO:  A causa de la interrupción de fondos federales, este sitio de web no será administrado activamente. La última actualización a este sitio web se realizó el 21 de diciembre de 2018 y no se harán más actualizaciones hasta que el gobierno reanude operaciones; por ende, puede que el sitio web no refleje la información más reciente. Es posible que no podamos procesar transacciones ni responder a
preguntas hasta que se reanuden operaciones.

Trade

U.S. Customs and Border Protection has direct responsibility for enhancing U.S. economic competitiveness. By reducing costs for industry and enforcing trade laws against counterfeit, unsafe, and fraudulently entered goods, CBP is working to enable legitimate trade, contribute to American economic prosperity, and protect against risks to public health and safety.

21st Century Customs Framework

CBP is cognizant of the need to stay modern in order to meet the challenges of an evolving trade landscape.  New actors, industries, and modes of conducting business have emerged, disrupting the traditional global supply chain.  To continue to effectively fulfill CBP’s mission, CBP is pursuing an initiative titled “The 21st Century Customs Framework” (21CCF).  The 21CCF seeks to address and enhance numerous aspects of CBP’s trade mission to better position the agency to operate in the 21st century trade environment. 

On December 21, 2018, CBP announced through a Federal Register Notice that it will host a Public Meeting on March 1, 2019, to consider public input on the 21CCF themes: Emerging Roles in the Global Supply Chain; Intelligent Enforcement; Cutting-Edge Technology; Data Access and Sharing; 21st Century Processes; and Self-Funded Customs Infrastructure. REGISTER NOW to attend the meeting in person or participate via teleconferenceAll those wishing to attend the meeting, including Federal employees and members of the press, must register. Registration will close no sooner than February 4, 2019.


Updates to Enforcement of Presidential Proclamation on Steel and Aluminum Tariffs - Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962

On March 8, 2018, the President issued Proclamations 9704 and 9705 on Adjusting Imports of Steel and Aluminum into the United States, under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1862), providing for additional import duties for steel mill and aluminum articles, effective March 23, 2018.  See the Federal Register, 83 FR 11619 and 83 FR 11625, March 15, 2018.  On March 22, 2018, the President issued Proclamations on Adjusting Imports of Steel and Aluminum into the United States. See the Federal Register, 83 FR 13355 and 83 FR 13361, March 28, 2018.  On April 30, 2018, the President issued Proclamations 9739 and 9740 on Adjusting Imports of Steel and Aluminum into the United States.  See the Federal Register, 83 FR 20683 and 83 FR 20677, May 7, 2018.  On May 31, 2018, the President issued Proclamations on Adjusting Imports of Steel and Aluminum into the United States.  These duty requirements are effective with respect to goods entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after 12:01 a.m. eastern daylight time on March 23, 2018.


CBP Establishes New Procedures to Investigate Trade Related Allegations


AD/CVD Scam Alert

Did You Receive an Email Offering a "Solution" to Avoid Antidumping Duties?  This is a violation of U.S. Law.  Read more here.

CBP Trade Enforcement - Operational Approach

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is committed to protecting national economic security by enforcing U.S. trade laws through its Trade Enforcement efforts. The CBP Trade Enforcement Operational Approach demonstrates how CBP is using all of its authorities to combat trade fraud by DETECTING high-risk activity, DETERRING non-compliance, and DISRUPTING fraudulent behavior. CBP will use all methods at its disposal—including increased bonding, enhanced targeting and inspection of high-risk imports, and swift and thorough review of allegations to ensure a fair and competitive trade environment.

Quarterly CBP Trade Enforcement Bulletin

The Quarterly CBP Trade Enforcement Bulletin highlights some of the many successes in which CBP enforces U.S. trade laws at and beyond our nation’s borders through interagency partnership and collaboration. As depicted in these success stories, CBP focuses its trade enforcement efforts on the agency’s Priority Trade Issues, and is committed to facilitating a proactive, aggressive, and dynamic trade enforcement system that protects the American consumer and our nation’s economic prosperity.

Now available:

Locate Port Information

CBP provides security and facilitation operations at 328 ports of entry throughout the country. Use this interactive map to find information specific to air, sea and land entries.

Learn More

U.S. Map for Ports of Entry

 

Questions?

Question Mark

Find answers at the CBP Info Center.

 

Last modified: 
December 21, 2018
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