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CBP Reminds Travelers from Canada that Marijuana Remains Illegal in the United States

As Canada prepares to legalize recreational marijuana starting Oct. 17, 2018, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) would like to remind travelers that marijuana is a controlled substance under United States federal law.  The sale, possession, production, distribution or the facilitation of the aforementioned of both medical and recreational marijuana remains illegal under U.S. federal law. As federal law prohibits the importation and exportation of marijuana, crossing the international border or arriving at a U.S. port of entry with marijuana may result in seizure, fines, and/or arrest, and may impact admissibility.

CBP officers at U.S. ports of entry and Preclearance locations will continue to process travelers in accordance with federal law, including those laws pertaining to controlled substances and with the Immigration and Nationality Act, which broadly governs the admissibility of travelers into the United States. Determinations about admissibility and whether any regulatory or criminal enforcement is appropriate are made by a CBP officer based on the facts and circumstances known to the officer at the time.

CBP is responsible for enforcing the laws of the United States at the border at and between ports of entry. Requirements for international travelers wishing to enter the U.S. are governed by and conducted in accordance with U.S. federal law. Although medical and recreational marijuana may be legal in some U.S. states and Canada, it remains illegal  under United States federal law.

For more information regarding U.S. entry requirements, visit https://www.cbp.gov/travel.

Last modified: 
September 21, 2018
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