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Dulles CBP Picks Counterfeit Guitars to the Tune of $158K

Release Date: 
February 8, 2021

STERLING, Va. – Even Slash, Angus Young and Jimmy Page might have a difficult time ripping raging riffs or picking sick licks on these strings.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at Washington Dulles International Airport recently seized 36 counterfeit guitars from China that, if authentic, would have had a manufacturer’s suggested retail price of $158, 692.
CBP officers recently seized these 36 counterfeit
guitars from China.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at Washington Dulles International Airport seized 36 counterfeit guitars recently that if authentic, would have had a manufacturer’s suggested retail price of $158,692.

The guitars arrived in 36 different shipments from China on December 15. Officers suspected the guitars to be counterfeit and detained them to continue their investigation. The collection consisted of 27 Gibson, six Fender, two CF Martin and one Paul Reed Smith guitars.

Many of the Gibsons were of the Les Paul line of custom guitars. Even Jimmy Page’s Gibson Double Neck made the collection, as did an ax autographed by Guns and Roses guitarist Slash. The most expensive was a Gibson Ace Frehley guitar valued at an MSRP of $9,000. The collection of counterfeit guitars included two acoustic models as well.

The guitars were destined to address in 21 states and to Australia.

CBP import specialists worked with the trademark holders and confirmed the guitars to be counterfeit. CBPO officers completed the seizure on January 20.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at Washington Dulles International Airport recently seized 36 counterfeit guitars from China that, if authentic, would have had a manufacturer’s suggested retail price of $158, 692.
Among the counterfeit guitars was this
Gibson Slash autographed model.

Counterfeit consumer goods are illegal, violate lawful property rights, result in job loss, steal tax revenues from our nation’s economy, and are often constructed in unregulated facilities with potentially harmful materials that could threaten consumers’ health. CBP encourages consumers to protect themselves and their families by always purchasing safe, authentic goods from reputable vendors.

“Transnational criminal organizations will counterfeit anything that generates illicit revenues, and unscrupulous vendors line their pockets by preying on unsuspecting consumers,” said Keith Fleming, CBP’s Acting Director of Field Operations in Baltimore. “Protecting intellectual property rights is a Customs and Border Protection trade enforcement priority, and CBP officers will continue to seize counterfeit and potentially unsafe consumer goods when we encounter them.”

CBP officers have not encountered any additional guitars since these 36 arrived.

CBP protects businesses and consumers every day through an aggressive Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) enforcement program. Importation of counterfeit merchandise can cause significant revenue loss, damage the U.S. economy, and threaten the health and safety of the American people.

On a typical day in 2019, CBP officers seized $4.3 million worth of products with Intellectual Property Rights violations. Learn more about what CBP did during "A Typical Day" in 2019.

CBP officers and Homeland Security Investigation (HSI) agents seized 27,599 shipments containing counterfeit goods in Fiscal Year (FY) 2019, down from 33,810 seizures in FY 2018. However, the total estimated manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of the seized goods, had they been genuine, increased to over $1.5 billion from nearly $1.4 billion in FY 2018.

E- Commerce sales have contributed to large volumes of low-value packages imported into the United States. In FY 2019, there were 144 million express shipments and 463 million international mail shipments. Over 90 percent of all intellectual property seizures occur in the international mail and express environments

The People’s Republic of China (mainland China and Hong Kong) remained the primary source economy for seized counterfeit and pirated goods, accounting for 83 percent of all IPR seizures and 92 percent of the estimated MSRP value of all IPR seizures.

Read CBP’s Intellectual Property Seizure Report for Fiscal Year 2019 for more IPR stats and analysis.

CBP's border security mission is led at ports of entry by CBP officers from the Office of Field Operations.  Please visit CBP Ports of Entry to learn more about how CBP’s Office of Field Operations secures our nation’s borders. Learn more about CBP at www.CBP.gov.

Follow the Director of CBP’s Baltimore Field Office on Twitter at @DFOBaltimore and on Instagram at @dfobaltimore for breaking news, current events, human-interest stories and photos.

Last modified: 
February 8, 2021