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CBP Officers at Eagle Pass Nab Man Wanted for Indecency With a Child

Release Date: 
July 13, 2012

Eagle Pass, Texas - U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the Eagle Pass Port of Entry Monday arrested a Houston man wanted in Grand Prairie for indecency with a child.

Monday evening CBP officers at Eagle Pass International Bridge inspected a 2008 Nissan Altima, upon its arrival from Mexico. During routine records checks, a CBP officer discovered a passenger in the vehicle was wanted, on a warrant out of Grand Prairie, for indecency with a child. Salvador Rizo Ramos, 52, of Houston, was turned over to the Department of Public Safety.

"CBP's Office of Field Operations is the country's first line of defense against threats entering the country," said Cynthia O. Rodriguez, CBP Port Director, Eagle Pass. "When wanted subjects attempt to enter the country through ports of entry, routine checks through national databases allow us to detect and detain them for the proper authorities."

The Office of Field Operations is the primary organization within Customs and Border Protection tasked with an anti-terrorism mission at our nation's ports. CBP officers screen all people, vehicles and goods entering the United States while facilitating the flow of legitimate trade and travel. Their mission also includes carrying out border-related duties, including narcotics interdiction, enforcing immigration and trade laws, and protecting the nation's food supply and agriculture industry from pests and diseases.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection is the unified border agency within the Department of Homeland Security charged with the management, control and protection of our nation's borders at and between official ports of entry. CBP is charged with keeping terrorists and terrorist weapons out of the country while enforcing hundreds of U.S. laws.

Last modified: 
February 9, 2017