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CBP rescues 12 Cubans that landed in Mona Island

Release Date: 
July 15, 2016

AGUADILLA, Puerto Rico – U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) rescued and apprehended Thursday 12 Cuban migrants after landing in Mona Island.  

“Crossing the Mona Passage is a treacherous voyage filled with many dangers that pose a huge risk to migrants,” stated Ramiro Cerrillo, Ramey Sector Chief Patrol Agent. “Migrants continue to place themselves at the mercy of smugglers who have complete disregard for their safety and leave them within the shores of Mona knowing the dangers involved.”

Mona Island is an inhabited natural reserve that is part of the territory of Puerto Rico
Mona Island is an inhabited natural
reserve that is part of the territory of
Puerto Rico

Park Rangers from the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources (DNER), on Mona Island, reported the presence of 12 undocumented migrants (10 males & 2 females) claiming to be Cuban nationals.  The group was dropped off by smugglers in Punta Arenas beach of the island.

A CBP Air and Marine Operations (AMO) Blackhawk helicopter removed and transported the group to Ramey where Border Patrol agents took custody of all subjects.

“Migrants continue to place themselves at the mercy of smugglers who have complete disregard for their safety and leave them within the shores of Mona knowing the dangers involved,” said Johnny Morales, Director of Air Operations for the Caribbean Air and Marine Branch.

Last Sunday, 14 Cuban migrants were apprehended by CBP after they landed in Punta Sardineras in Mona Island.  Five migrants were treated for sunburns. 

The Administration has no plans to change the current immigration policy toward Cuba or seek legislative changes in relation to the Cuban Adjustment Act.

CBP maintains a strong position regarding the enforcement of our immigration laws along the country's borders and coastal areas.

After admissibility processing at the Border Patrol Station, Cuban nationals will receive a Notice to Appear (NTA) before an Immigration Judge, for further proceedings under the Cuban Migration Agreement of 1995 and the Cuban Adjustment Act of 1966.

Last modified: 
February 9, 2017