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CBP Officers Seize Over 200 Pounds of Meth from Grandmother and Granddaughter

Release Date: 
January 22, 2020

SAN DIEGO – U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers working at the ports of entry in the San Diego and Imperial Valley Counties over the weekend intercepted more than 200 pounds of methamphetamine from a grandmother and granddaughter and apprehended two fugitives.

On Jan. 19, at about 12:40 p.m., a 65-year-old woman and her 19-year-old granddaughter, both U.S. citizens, entered the Andrade port of entry driving a 2006 Dodge Durango.  A CBP canine team was roving through vehicle lanes when the canine alerted to the vehicle’s passenger side door.  The CBP officer referred the vehicle and passengers for a further intensive inspection.

CBP officers later extracted and seized 299 packages of methamphetamine, weighing 219 pounds from the vehicle’s roof, doors and quarter panels. The narcotics have an estimated street value of more than $416,000. 

CBP seized the vehicle and drugs. Both women were turned over to Homeland Security Investigation agents for further processing.

Later that day at approximately 3:48 p.m., a 44-year-old man entered on foot through Otay Mesa port of entry. A CBP officer referred the Mexican citizen and lawful permanent resident for further inspection.

CBP officers confirmed that Adan Larios had an active felony warrant for sex crimes with a minor from the Riverside County Police Department with a bail set at $1 million. He was turned over to San Diego County Sheriff’s office pending extradition to Riverside, CA.

On Jan. 20, at approximately 12:11 p.m., a 23-year-old male U.S. citizen entered the San Ysidro port of entry driving a 2008 BMW X5.  A CBP officer conducting inspections referred the man for further inspection.

CBP officers confirmed that Eduardo Aguilar had an active warrant for homicide from the Denver Colorado Sheriff’s Department with no bail set.  Aguilar was transported to San Diego County Jail pending extradition.

“These cases are just examples of the apprehensions CBP officers catch on a daily basis,” said Pete Flores, Director of Field Operations for CBP in San Diego.  “CBP officers are vigilant to stop those who would do harm in our communities at the border, as they attempt to enter the U.S.”

Criminal charges are merely allegations.  Defendants are presumed innocent unless proven guilty in a court of law.

Last modified: 
January 22, 2020