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Atlanta CBP Arrest Boston Traveler on Child Exploitation Charge

Release Date: 
January 25, 2017

ATLANTA – U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers arrested a Boston resident for possession of child pornography at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL) on Friday.

CBP Office of Field Operations, ATL
CBP Office of Field Operations on duty at
Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International
Airport

CBP officers arrested Elvis Henry Idada, 31, after he arrived on a flight from Nigeria.

“Sexual exploitation of children shocks and offends the common decency of our society,” said Carey Davis, CBP Port Director for the Area Port of Atlanta. “We remain vigilant and prepared to detect and intercept all persons, baggage and merchandise that do not comply with our laws.”

During a secondary examination, CBP officers discovered alleged child pornography in a cell phone in Idada’s possession. CBP officers arrested Idada and turned him over to Clayton County Police to face child exploitation charges.

Suspected child sexual exploitation or missing children may be reported to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, an Operation Predator partner, via its toll-free 24-hour hotline, 1-800-THE-LOST.

CBP Office of Field Operations is responsible for securing our borders at the ports of entry. CBP officers’ primary mission is anti-terrorism; they screen all people, vehicles, and goods entering the U.S., while facilitating the flow of legitimate trade and travel into and out of the country.

CBP routinely conducts inspection operations on arriving and departing international flights, and arrests an average of 23 wanted persons every day at U.S. ports of entry nationwide. CBP officers and agriculture specialists also intercept narcotics, weapons, currency, prohibited agriculture products, and other illicit items. View the CBP Snapshot to learn more of what CBP achieves ‘On a Typical Day.’

Criminal charges are merely allegations.  Defendants are presumed innocent unless proven guilty in a court of law.

Last modified: 
February 13, 2017