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Are Valentine’s Day Perfume Discounts a Good Deal, Maybe Not?

Release Date: 
February 11, 2021

CBP Seizes Counterfeit Designer Perfumes Arriving from Hong Kong

Blu Channel
In total, CBP seized 3,738 bottles of counterfeit
perfume in this shipment alone.     

LOS ANGELES - U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officers located at the Los Angeles/Long Beach (LA/LB) Seaport recently seized a shipment containing counterfeit designer perfumes with a total Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) value over $366,000.

CBP Officers at the LA/LB Seaport examined a shipment with over 1,000 cartons manifested as cellular phone accessories imported from Hong Kong.  During the inspection, CBP Officers discovered over 80 cartons that actually contained counterfeit perfumes violating the Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) of some notable companies, such as Dior, Chanel and Paco Rabanne.  

CBP Import Specialists from the Consumer Products Mass Merchandising (CPMM) Center determined the perfumes infringed on various trademarks and were counterfeit, violating United States laws.  In total, CBP seized 3,738 bottles of counterfeit perfume in this shipment alone. 

Sauvage
The seized perfume  had an estimated Manufacturer’s
Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) value over $366,000.

    

“Part of our critical CBP mission is to facilitate legitimate trade with a goal of protecting American consumers from dangerous products and to create a level playing field for American businesses,” said Carlos C. Martel, Director, CBP Office of Field Operations in Los Angeles. “In this case, we have succeeded in our mission by protecting the American consumer from the potential harm associated with counterfeit perfumes, which can sometimes contain unknown chemicals, and by protecting the intellectual property rights of legitimate businesses.”

Counterfeiters want to make a profit and do not care about consumers’ well-being.  Many counterfeit products are of low-quality and can cause injuries.  Additionally, profits gained by selling counterfeit products can potentially be used to support terrorism and other criminal organizations. 

“CBP Officers at the LA/LB Seaport do a tremendous job each and every day to protect the American people from dangerous goods,” said Donald R. Kusser, Port Director, the LA/LB Seaport.  “Even during a worldwide pandemic, CBP has remained steadfast and dedicated to our mission.”

As part of the CBP mission, every year, millions of counterfeit goods imported from various countries are seized by CBP to protect United States businesses and consumers.  Many of these seized items pose health and safety risks, and infringe on various trademarks that can include an array of products such as smartphones and related accessories, electronics, apparel, shoes, cosmetics, and high-end luxury goods. 

Goods posing significant health and safety concerns include: counterfeit pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, bicycle and motorcycle helmets, medical devices, supplements, and other consumables. Counterfeit goods sold online and in stores hurt the United States economy, cost Americans their jobs, threaten consumer health and safety, and fund criminal activity.  Visit the National IPR Coordination Center for more information about IPR, including counterfeiting and piracy.

In Fiscal Year 2020, nationally CBP seized 26,503 shipments containing goods that violated intellectual property rights.  The total estimated value of the seized goods, if genuine, would have been nearly $1.3 billion.

CBP has established an educational initiative to raise consumer awareness about the consequences and dangers often associated with the purchase of counterfeit and pirated goods. Information about The Truth Behind Counterfeits public awareness campaign can be found at https://www.cbp.gov/FakeGoodsRealDangers.

CBP’s border security mission is led at ports of entry by CBP officers from the Office of Field Operations.  Please visit CBP Ports of Entry to learn more about how CBP’s Office of Field Operations secures our nation’s borders.  Learn more about CBP at www.CBP.gov.

Last modified: 
February 11, 2021