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CBP Seizes Fake Monster Tails

Release Date: 
November 18, 2014

Popular Craft Item is Counterfeit Target

DALLAS – U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers working at the Dallas/Fort Worth International airport seized 200 Rainbow Loom ® Monster Tail ™ kits, Nov. 16.

Two hundred of these counterfeit Rainbow Loom kits were seized in Dallas.

Two hundred of these counterfeit Rainbow Loom kits were seized in Dallas.

“This seizure is indicative of the level of attention CBP officers are paying to protect consumers from harmful counterfeit products,” said CBP Area Port Director Cleatus Hunt.  “Genuine products pass rigorous safety testing while cheap imitations, though packaged to look authentic, are an inferior product containing harmful substances.”

Common harmful substances found in counterfeit toys include lead or phthalates.

The counterfeit craft item was made in China and enroute to La Paz, Bolivia.  CBP officers examined the shipment of 15 cartons which was manifested as necklaces when it arrived in Dallas.  Upon examination, officers discovered the popular children’s kits among the cartons and after verifying the kits were counterfeit, seized the cartons containing the kits.

Protecting intellectual property rights is a priority CBP trade issue because counterfeit and pirated goods not only hurt American businesses, these products are often associated with criminal activities and fund other criminal enterprises. 

Counterfeit Rainbow Loom Monster Tail kits were seized in Dallas.

Counterfeit Rainbow Loom Monster Tail kits were seized in Dallas.

For this particular seizure, a primary concern was the risk the counterfeit kits posed to the consumer.  Rainbow Loom ® cautions against purchasing counterfeit kits with illustrations of the dangers fake kits pose to consumers.

Shoppers who suspect they purchased a counterfeit item should discontinue using the product and contact the National IPR coordination center. Consumers can learn about getting their money back by visiting the Federal Trade Commission.

As the holiday shopping season begins, shoppers can protect themselves by learning how to spot a fake at Stopfakes.gov.

CBP will destroy the seized counterfeit kits.

Last modified: 
February 9, 2017