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Ajo Opens New LEED Gold Certified Border Patrol Station

Release Date: 
December 5, 2012

 

Replacing the original Ajo Station in Why, Ariz., is a new-state-of-the-art facility consisting of nearly 54,000 square feet of administrative and detention space built on 30 acres, which can accommodate approximately 500 agents and mission support personnel.

Replacing the original Ajo Station in Why, Ariz., is a new-state-of-the-art facility consisting of nearly 54,000 square feet of administrative and detention space built on 30 acres, which can accommodate approximately 500 agents and mission support personnel.

The original Ajo Station, located in the small town of Why, Ariz., and built in 1987 to accommodate 25 agents, is considered by many to be one of the last "Old Patrol" stations in the Border Patrol. Now there is a new-state-of-the-art Ajo Station, consisting of nearly 54,000 square feet of administrative and detention space built on 30 acres, which can accommodate approximately 500 agents and mission support personnel.

The building was designed and constructed with energy savings in mind. Solar panels supply roughly half of the Station's electrical needs during daylight hours, due in large part to natural lighting that greatly reduces the need for daytime lighting.

Lighting and HVAC automatically adjusts output based on occupancy, saving taxpayers money by reducing operating costs while demonstrating CBP's commitment to being good stewards of the environment.

A ribbon cutting ceremony was held at the new Ajo Border Patrol Station.

Participating in a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new Ajo Border Patrol Station near Why, Ariz., are (from left) Mitchell Merriam, Deputy Commander Joint Field Command - Arizona; Douglas Adkins, Supervisory Border Patrol Agent Ajo Station; Joe Cruz, Division Chief Tucson Sector Border Patrol Headquarters; Jack Jeffries, Patrol Agent in Charge Ajo Station; and Loren Flossman, Director of Border Patrol Facilities and Tactical Infrastructure, Facility Management and Engineering.

Additionally, all plumbing fixtures are low-flow, reducing water usage by 30 percent. The building is also well insulated to reduce heating and cooling costs.

Other features include storm water pollution prevention systems and a parking area made of concrete instead of asphalt, which retains less heat and reduces energy consumption within the building. Landscaping includes native, desert plants that tolerate Arizona's dry climate.

Ajo Station's variety of advanced technologies has earned it a "Gold Certification" from the United States Green Building Council, under the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program.

The Station was constructed at a cost of $28.5 million and represents a sound investment in the Border Patrol's future and our nation's security.

 

Last modified: 
February 8, 2017