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CBP, Taiwan AEO Agree to Cargo Security Program Standards

Release Date: 
November 27, 2012

ROSSLYN, Va.—The American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) and the Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office in the United States (TECRO) signed on November 26, 2012 a mutual recognition arrangement concerning the supply chain security program of their designated representatives. The designated representatives responsible for implementing this arrangement are:

 

  • For AIT, the designated representative is the United States Department of Homeland Security through U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
  • For TECRO, the designated representative is the Directorate General of Customs, Taiwan Ministry of Finance.

 

Under this AIT/TECRO Arrangement, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Deputy Commissioner David V. Aguilar and Taiwan Ministry of Finance Deputy Minister Ding-Fang Huang agreed to mutual standards in Taiwan's Authorized Economic Operator (AEO) program and the U.S.'s Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT) program here today.

The arrangement recognizes the compatibility between the Taiwan and U.S. cargo security programs and acknowledges that Directorate General of Customs, Taiwan Ministry of Finance and CBP will accept the security status of members of the other program.

Managing Director of AIT, Barbara Schrage and Acting Representative of TECRO, Ta Tung Jacob Chang signed the mutual recognition arrangement. CBP Assistant Commissioner for International Affairs Charles Stallworth and Taiwan Ministry of Finance Deputy Minister Ding-Fang Huang both observed the signing.

C-TPAT is a voluntary U.S. Government-business initiative to build cooperative relationships that strengthen and improve overall international supply chain and U.S. border security. C-TPAT recognized that U.S. Customs and Border Protection can provide the highest level of cargo security only through close cooperation with the ultimate owners of the international supply chain such as importers, carriers, consolidators, licensed customs brokers, and manufacturers.

"CBP's international relationships are essential to securing the global supply chain," said Deputy Commissioner Aguilar. "Today's mutual recognition arrangement with our partners in Taiwan Customs marks an important step toward realizing our 21st Century border management vision."

The arrangement recognizes compatibility between the Taiwan and U.S. cargo security programs and acknowledges that Directorate General of Customs, Taiwan Ministry of Finance and CBP will accept the security status of members of the other program. Additionally, the mutual recognition arrangement will allow for closer collaboration between agencies and greater benefits and common standards to the trade community. The United States has signed previously mutual recognition arrangements with New Zealand, Canada, Jordan, Japan, Korea and The European Union.

Mutual recognition is a key concept within the APEC Framework for Secure Trade and helps to promote end-to-end supply chain security and facilitation at a global level. Similarly, the integration of border security and trade facilitation is an essential part of the Department of Homeland Security's vision for a layered risk management and risk segmentation strategy, which extends security beyond our physical borders.

Last modified: 
February 9, 2017