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U.S. Border Patrol Nabs 5 with Criminal Records

Release Date: 
October 12, 2011

Tucson, Ariz. - Five individuals with extensive criminal histories were apprehended over the holiday weekend by the Tucson Sector Border Patrol, a component of the Customs and Border Protection's Joint Field Command-Arizona.

Naco Station agents apprehended a 34-year-old male from Jalisco, Mexico, Saturday for illegally entering the United States. During processing, agents discovered his lengthy criminal history including convictions in Oregon for 3rd degree sexual abuse in 1996, multiple DUI offenses, failure to register as a sex offender, and a conviction in 1997 for attempted sexual battery and burglary in Virginia. Records also showed he was previously removed from the United States. He is being is being prosecuted for illegal re-entry of an aggravated felon.

Ajo Station agents apprehended a 22-year-old male from Jalisco, Mexico, Monday in the West Desert for illegally entering the United States. During processing, the man admitted to being a Sureno 13 gang member and record checks revealed he was convicted as a juvenile and served more than seven years for aggravated assault and assisting a criminal street gang. Records also showed he was removed from the United States in February through the Nogales Port. The subject will be submitted for prosecution of re-entry of an aggravated felon.

Casa Grande Station agents apprehended a 49-year-old Mexican national for illegal entry into the United States on Sunday. During processing, agents discovered the subject was convicted of 2nd degree murder in California in 1997 and sentenced to six years in prison. He was later removed from the United States through El Centro, Calif. The subject is being prosecuted for illegal re-entry of an aggravated felon.

Monday, Casa Grande agents apprehended a 25-year-old Mexican national in the West Desert for illegally entering the United States. During processing, agents identified tattoos indicating the man was a member of the Sureño street gang. Records revealed he was convicted of 2nd degree robbery causing physical injury and sentenced to more than two years in prison in Queens County, N.Y. He was ordered removed through Harlingen, Tex in May. He is being prosecuted for re-entry of an aggravated felon.

Also on Monday, Casa Grande agents apprehended a 29-year-old male from Mexico for illegally entering the United States. Record checks revealed he had a prior conviction in Santa Barbara, Calif., for sex with a minor three years or younger in 2002. The subject was sentenced to 60 months probation and 186 days in prison. The subject was previously removed from the United States through the San Ysidro, Calif., Port in 2002. He is being prosecuted for illegal re-entry.

All individuals apprehended by the Border Patrol undergo criminal history checks using the Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System, a vital tool that ensures illegal aliens with criminal histories are identified and receive the appropriate consequence. In addition to enforcing immigration laws, the Border Patrol contributes to a safer America by removing dangerous criminals from the country.

Customs and Border Protection announced the JFC-AZ in February 2011 as an organizational realignment that brings together the Tucson and Yuma Border Patrol Sectors and their Air Branches, as well as the Tucson Field Office, under a unified command structure. JFC-AZ integrates CBP's border security, commercial enforcement and trade facilitation missions to more effectively meet the unique challenges faced in Arizona. Follow us on Twitter @CBPArizona. You may also visit the Joint Field Command Arizona page for more information.

CBP appreciates assistance from the community. Suspicious activity can be reported by calling the U.S. Border Patrol at (1-877) 872-7435. All calls will be answered and remain anonymous.

Last modified: 
February 9, 2017