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Philly CBP Arrests Maryland Man on Heroin Arrest Warrant

Release Date: 
December 30, 2013

Philadelphia — U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers arrested a Maryland man at Philadelphia International Airport Saturday who was wanted by the Drug Enforcement Administration on heroin charges.

CBP officers arrested Darius Nicholson, 33, of Centerville, after Nicholson arrived aboard a flight from Bermuda about 4 p.m. Officers confirmed Nicholson’s identity and confirmed that the arrest warrant remained active. Officers later turned Nicholson over to DEA agents Saturday night.

CBP officers, working at a preclearance station at L.F. Wade International Airport in Bermuda, initially identified that Nicholson was wanted by the DEA and notified CBP officers in Philadelphia. 

“As our nation’s premier border security agency, Customs and Border Protection officers take great pride in identifying arriving and departing wanted persons at our international ports of entry, and returning them to our law enforcement partners to face justice,” said Tarance Drafts, acting CBP port director for the Area Port of Philadelphia.

CBP staffs 15 preclearance locations in five countries, including Aruba, Bermuda, The Bahamas, Ireland and Canada.

Preclearance supports CBP’s extended border strategy by provid­ing for the cus­toms and immigration process for commercial passengers at host country airports and facilities prior to their arrival in the U.S.

CBP conducts inspection operations and intercepts currency, weapons, prohibited agriculture products or other illicit items, and on average makes 54 criminal arrests a day at U. S. ports of entry nationwide.

Criminal complaints are only charges and not evidence of guilt.  A defendant is presumed to be innocent until and unless proven guilty.

 
Last modified: 
February 9, 2017