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Philadelphia CBP Flexes Trade Enforcement Muscle and Seizes $35k Shipment of Counterfeit Smart Wristbands

Release Date: 
January 12, 2016

PHILADELPHIA – Some people may have an excuse for already abandoning their New Year’s fitness resolution: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) seized $35,000 in counterfeit smart wristbands recently in Philadelphia.

Philadelphia CBP seized 350 counterfeit smart wristbands that, if authentic, would have had an MSRP of about $35,000.

Philadelphia CBP seized 350 counterfeit smart wristbands that, if authentic, would have had an MSRP of about $35,000.

The shipment arrived from Hong Kong on December 4, 2015. Working with the trademark holder, CBP determined that the 350 smart wristbands were counterfeit, and seized them on January 4. If authentic, the smart wristbands would have had a total estimated manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of about $35,000.

“Customs and Border Protection will continue to work closely with our trade and consumer safety partners to identify and seize counterfeit and substandard merchandise, especially those products that pose potential harm to American consumers,” said Susan Stranieri, CBP Port Director for the Area Port of Philadelphia. “Intellectual property rights enforcement is a CBP priority trade issue, and a mission that we take very seriously.”

The theft of intellectual property and trade in fake goods threaten America’s economic vitality and national security, and the American people’s health and safety. Trade in illicit goods funds criminal activities and organized crime.

To protect both private industry and consumers, CBP has made Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) enforcement a CBP Priority Trade Issue.

CBP routinely conducts inspection operations on arriving and departing international flights and intercepts narcotics, weapons, currency, prohibited agriculture products, and other illicit items. View CBP Snapshot to learn some of what CBP achieves ‘On a Typical Day.’

Learn more about CBP at CBP.gov.

Last modified: 
February 9, 2017