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New Orleans CBP Arrests Indiana Man on Child Battery Charges

Release Date: 
December 21, 2015

NEW ORLEANS – U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers arrested an Indiana man, wanted in Indiana on child assault charges, after the man disembarked Sunday from a cruise ship in New Orleans.

CBP arrested Eric Gaudern, 23, of Charlestown, Ind., after CBP verified Gaudern’s identity, and confirmed with Jeffersonville, Ind., Police that they desired extradition. CBP turned him over to Harbor Police and the Orleans Parish Police Department.

Gaudern is charged with battery resulting in serious injury, neglect of a dependent resulting in serious injury, and battery of a person less than 14 years old. The charges stem over allegations that Gaudern and his wife caused a brain injury to their six-month-old son.

Gaudern was a passenger aboard the cruise ship Norwegian Dawn. Ship security and the U.S. Coast Guard cooperated in this arrest.

“Arresting this fugitive illustrates the watchfulness, attention to detail, and commitment to duty that our Customs and Border Protection officers exhibit every day to help keep our communities safe,” said Vernon Foret, CBP Area Port Director for the Port of New Orleans.

On average, CBP arrests 22 wanted persons every day at air, land and sea ports of entry across the United States.

CBP routinely conducts inspection operations on arriving and departing international flights and intercepts narcotics, weapons, currency, prohibited agriculture products, and other illicit items. View CBP’s ‘On a Typical Day’ enforcement stats at CBP Snapshot.

Travelers are encouraged to visit CBP’s Travel section to learn rules, tips and advice to help quickly complete their CBP international arrivals inspection.

Criminal charges are merely allegations. Defendants are presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty in a court of law.

Last modified: 
February 9, 2017