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More Than 16,000 Counterfeit Hermes Handbags Seized by CBP

Release Date: 
September 27, 2013

LOS ANGELES—U.S. Customs & Border Protection (CBP) officers and import specialists at the Los Angeles/Long Beach Seaport complex seized 16,053 counterfeit Hermes handbags in nine shipments from June 6 through September 17. All were in violation of the Hermes protected trademark.

A total of 16,053 counterfeit Hermes handbags in nine shipments from June 6 through September 17, were seized by CBP in Los Angeles. All were in violation of the Hermes protected trademark.

A total of 16,053 counterfeit Hermes handbags in nine shipments from June 6 through September 17, were seized by CBP in Los Angeles. All were in violation of the Hermes protected trademark.

Their combined domestic value of $295,665 contrasted to the manufacturer suggested retail price of $210,785,475 had they been genuine, illustrates the potentially high profit margins in such an illegal venture.

"CBP officers are trained to identify and interdict counterfeit goods, and this is a great example of how their training and expertise are employed every day in our ports of entry," said CBP Director of Field Operations in Los Angeles Todd C. Owen. "These counterfeiters are not only cheating the legitimate designers and manufacturers of protected trademark merchandise, but also the public and the U.S. government," he added.

Eight of the shipments were coming from China, one from China via Hong Kong. Two had the knock-offs hidden in the nose of the containers with concealing attempts of packing legitimate, non-infringing merchandise behind them.

Five different importers sent the shipments. All were destined to surrounding areas of Los Angeles except for one destined to Texas.

If handbags had been genuine, the estimated  manufacturer suggested retail price would be more than $210 million.

If handbags had been genuine, the estimated manufacturer suggested retail price would be more than $210 million.

Approximately $1.26 billion worth of counterfeit goods originating overseas were seized by CBP in 2012. China, Hong Kong, Singapore, India and Taiwan are the top five countries of origination for counterfeit goods seized by CBP.

Nationwide, handbags and wallets comprised the greatest number of counterfeit items seized by CBP last year, with the value of seizures up 142 percent compared to 2011. Of the approximately $511 million in handbags and wallets seized, more than $446 million came from China.

Violations of trade laws, including violations of intellectual property rights laws can be reported to CBP online in an e-Allegations Submission.

Last modified: 
February 9, 2017