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Houston CBP Confiscates Silver, Gold, Cash

Release Date: 
May 31, 2010

Houston - U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the George Bush Intercontinental Airport, Houston, seized $253,294 in cash and $159,382 in gold and silver in 14 separate seizures during May.

CBP Officers seized $159,382 in gold and silver in 14 separate incidents during May at Houston's George Bush Intercontinental Airport.

CBP Officers seized $159,382 in gold and silver in 14 separate incidents during May at Houston's George Bush Intercontinental Airport.

"Customs and Border Protection is charged with enforcing hundreds of U.S. laws," said Jeffrey O. Baldwin, Sr., CBP Houston field operations director. "In this instance, the law requires anyone traveling to or from the U.S. carrying monetary instruments exceeding $10,000 declare that amount. When travelers fail to do that, they run the risk of having that currency or monetary instruments seized."

In nine separate instances, CBP officers seized currency from travelers departing the U.S. without declaring actual amounts even when asked directly. Officers discovered undeclared currency stuffed in envelopes, in pockets or carry-on bags and, in one instance, the currency was sewn into the traveler's boxer shorts.

Officers seized one bar of gold, two silver bullion bars and three bottles of gold nuggets because travelers failed to file a shipper's export declaration. This automated declaration is required when transporting a commodity out of the country valued at least $2,500. Failure to file a shipper's export declaration can result in the commodity's seizure.

According to the Department of Treasury's Financial Crimes Network, there is no limit to the amount of currency a traveler can bring into or take out of the country as long as any amount exceeding $10,000 is filed with CBP.

Seized currency is turned over to CBP's Fines, Penalties and Forfeitures division while Immigration and Customs Enforcement investigates to determine if criminal proceedings are warranted. All seized currency not related to a criminal case will be forward to the Department of Treasury.

Last modified: 
February 9, 2017