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Homicide Suspect Turned Over to U.S. Authorities At Niagara Falls Border Crossing

Release Date: 
July 30, 2010

Niagara Falls, N.Y.- U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) announced the arrest of a United States citizen wanted in Maryland on homicide charges.

On July 30, CBP officers received notification from Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) that Benjamin Moore, a 46- year-old United States citizen from Lexington Park, Maryland, was being deported from Canada and returned to the United States. Canadian authorities advised that Mr. Moore was taken into custody by Niagara Regional Police after a traffic stop in Niagara Falls, Ontario. Record checks by Canadian authorities revealed the possibility of an active warrant in the United States. Mr. Moore was deported from Canada by CBSA and returned to the United States via the Rainbow Bridge border crossing in Niagara Falls.

Upon his return to the United States, CBP officers verified the validity of the nation-wide felony warrant and confirmed the extradition. The warrant was issued July 26 by the St. Mary's County (MD) Sheriff's Department and charges Mr. Moore with homicide.

Mr. Moore was arrested by CBP on the active warrant and turned over to the custody of the U.S. Marshals Service pending extradition to Maryland. Mr. Moore's vehicle, which was preserved by CBSA as a possible crime scene, was recovered as evidence in Canada and turned over to the custody of the St. Mary's County Sheriff's Department and the Maryland State Police.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection is the unified border agency within the Department of Homeland Security charged with the management, control and protection of our nation's borders at and between the official ports of entry. CBP is charged with keeping terrorists and terrorist weapons out of the country while enforcing hundreds of U.S. laws.

Last modified: 
February 9, 2017