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Customs and Border Protection in South Texas Informs on Cabotage Compliance

Release Date: 
March 2, 2015

HIDALGO, Texas –U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Office of Field Operations (OFO) at the Hidalgo/Pharr/Anzalduas Port of Entry and within the entire Laredo Field Office, wants to provide the transportation industry, specifically those that employ drivers with B1/B2 laser visas with a better understanding of cabotage to help ensure compliance with federal immigration laws and regulations.

“Our rapport with the trade community and the transportation industry has always been healthy and our goal is to ensure that they remain well informed with U.S. immigration laws and regulations relative to the domestic and international transport of merchandise,” said Port Director Efrain Solis Jr., Hidalgo/Pharr/Anzalduas Port of Entry. “CBP’s Office of Field Operations seeks to have compliance with federal law on cabotage issues from transportation companies.”

Cabotage, in layman’s terms, is the domestic point to point U.S. carriage or hauling of goods in the U.S. by a B1 truck driver. Such domestic movement of merchandise by a driver holding a B1/B2 laser visa is a violation of the terms of that visa and can result in the cancelation of that document.

The Office of Field Operations wants transportation companies to be cognizant of the regulations imposed on their B-1 visa commercial truck drivers, and that drivers should refrain from the domestic U.S. transport of goods, even if those goods were foreign in origin. Obtaining an H-2B visa may be a better alternative for transportation industry companies to consider for their drivers.

Personnel throughout the Laredo Field Office can assist with CBP related issues and guide stakeholders seeking additional information to the various federal agencies who can explain the labor certification process, H-2B visa requirements and the petition process. 

Last modified: 
February 9, 2017