US flag Official website of the Department of Homeland Security

Archived Content

In an effort to keep CBP.gov current, the archive contains content from a previous administration or is otherwise outdated.

Counterfeit Pharmaceuticals Worth More Than $3.2 Million Seized By CBP Officers at Miami International Airport

Release Date: 
January 2, 2013

MIAMI—U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officers and Import Specialists at Miami International Airport intercepted about 181,000 counterfeit pills during the last four months. "Stopping counterfeit goods is a high priority for CBP, and we devote substantial resources-CBP officers and Import Specialists to identify cargo shipments, intercept, seize merchandise and penalize those who violate our intellectual property rights laws," said Roland Suliveras Customs and Border Protection Port Director.

 

CBP officers and Import Specialists at the Miami Internaitonal Airport seize counterfeit  drugs including Viagra tablets that violate U.S. intellectual property rights laws

Counterfeit Viagra seized by CBP officers at the Miami International Airport

 

CBP Officers at Miami International Airport selected two cargo shipments of tablets suspected for Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) violation in September and December. The manifest description was described as "pharmaceutical products" and CBP Officers along with Import Specialists determined the shipments to be counterfeit and therefore subject to seizure. The counterfeit pills infringed on registered trademark and could have caused a risk to the public. The domestic value for these two shipments was approximately $3.2 million dollars.

In FY 2011, CBP made approximately 24,792 Intellectual Property Rights seizures domestically valued at approximately $178 million dollars. The top three products seized were consumer electronics, footwear, and pharmaceuticals. "CBP continues to be in the forefront, protecting the public against potentially harmful counterfeit products," said Roland Suliveras.

Through the coordination of various disciplines within CBP, other agencies, international trading partners, and the importing trade community; CBP enforces the rights of intellectual property right holders. The prevention and reduction of this illicit and criminal trade is critical to the protection of the U.S. economy, consumers, and national security.

Last modified: 
February 9, 2017