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Cincinnati CBP Seizes Stone Statue Filled with Meth

Release Date: 
January 11, 2017

CINCINNATI—On December 30, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Cincinnati intercepted a shipment containing 53.46 pounds (gross weight) of methamphetamines at a local express consignment facility.

CBP officers selected the shipment for inspection while reviewing incoming cargo from Mexico. The package was manifested as “Mexican stone crafts,” and contained a decorative concrete snail that showed interior anomalies during an x-ray inspection. After drilling through the bottom of the snail, officers saw a white crystalline powder inside the statue. Officers tested the powder, which was positive for methamphetamines.

Concrete Snail filled with Meth
Concrete snail filled with
methamphetamines

“This particular interception and its unique concealment method showcases the consistency with which our officers and specialists are able to support legitimate trade while interrupting illegal drug trafficking attempts,” said CBP Cincinnati Port Director Richard Gillespie. “Our officers excel at preventing these sorts of dangerous drugs from reaching innocent citizens.”

The package was coming from Mexico City and was destined to a residence in Lawrenceville, Georgia.

Meth is a highly addictive and dangerous stimulant that can cause mood disturbances, paranoia, delusions, hallucinations, and permanent brain damage. It is classified as a Schedule II stimulant under the Controlled Substances Act.

CBP conducts operations at ports of entry throughout the United States, and regularly screens arriving international passengers and cargo for narcotics, weapons, and other restricted or prohibited products. CBP strives to serve as the premier law enforcement agency enhancing the Nation’s safety, security, and prosperity through collaboration, innovation, and integration.

Last modified: 
September 26, 2017