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Chicago CBP Canine "Shadow" Knows Drug Detection Making Four Opium Seizures in One Afternoon

Release Date: 
March 20, 2013

CHICAGO—Chicago Customs and Border Protection officers at the International Mail Facility near O'Hare Airport seized more than 30 pounds of opium saturated materials hidden inside four international mail shipments, all in one afternoon. CBP narcotics detector canine Shadow alerted to the illegal shipments stacking up four more drug interdictions in what looks like another banner year for the four-legged crime fighter. The combined projected value of the narcotics seized totaled $489,724.

 

Invoiced as

Invoiced as "Traditional Medicines," the parcel was opened and found to contain 38 small plastic bags of woodchips and leaves. CBP officers tested the woodchips and leaves resulting in a positive reaction for opium.

"CBP canine Shadow is an 8-year-old Belgian Malinois whose nose definitely knows how to ferret out hidden drugs in imported cargo and mail," said CBP Chicago Acting Director of Field Operations William A. Ferrara. "Shadow is one of the top dogs at the CBP O'Hare Mail Facility who works tirelessly keeping our country and communities safe from harmful drugs."

On March 18, at 2:30 p.m., CBP canine Shadow alerted to a parcel from Laos. The contents of the parcels were invoiced as "Hmong Dresses" and contained 38 pieces of decorative cloth. CBP officers tested the cloth resulting in a positive reaction for opium. The 38 pieces of opium saturated cloth had a combined weight of 15.06 pounds, valued at $238,682. The shipment was destined for an address in Wisconsin.

On March 18, at 5:30 p.m., CBP canine Shadow alerted to a parcel shipped from Laos. The contents of the parcel were undeclared and found to contain 10 individual pieces of cloth wrapped in plastic. CBP officers tested the cloths resulting in a positive reaction for opium. The ten pieces of opium saturated cloths had a combined weight of 4.84 pounds, valued at $76,707. The shipment was destined for an address in Minnesota.

 

CBP narcotics detector canine Shadow alerted to the illegal shipments stacking up four more drug interdictions in what looks like another banner year for the four-legged crime fighter.

CBP narcotics detector canine Shadow alerted to the illegal shipments stacking up four more drug interdictions in what looks like another banner year for the four-legged crime fighter.

On March 18, at 5:40 p.m., CBP canine Shadow alerted to a parcel shipped from Laos. Invoiced as "Traditional Medicines," the parcel was opened and found to contain 38 small plastic bags of woodchips and leaves. CBP officers tested the woodchips and leaves resulting in a positive reaction for opium. The 38 bags of woodchips and leaves had a combined weight of 6.16 pounds, valued at $97,628. The shipment was destined for an address in Wisconsin.

And on March 18, at 5:50 p.m. CBP canine Shadow alerted to another parcel from Laos. The contents of the parcel were also declared as "Traditional Medicines" and found to contain 53 small plastic bags of twigs and wood shavings. CBP officers tested the twigs and wood shavings resulting in a positive reaction for opium. The 53 bags of opium saturated twigs and wood shavings had a combined weight of 4.84 pounds, valued at $76,707. The shipment was destined for an address in Minnesota.

CBP officers stationed at international mail facilities routinely discover and seize drugs such as marijuana, opium, heroin, cocaine, and methamphetamine cleverly concealed in ingenious methods, arriving from throughout the world in foreign mail. CBP International Mail Facilities are located in Chicago, Ill.; Los Angeles, Calif.; San Francisco, Calif.; San Juan, PR; Seattle, Wash.; Honolulu, Hawaii; Jamaica, N.Y.; Miami, Fla.; Jersey City, N.J. and Charlotte Amalie, Virgin Islands.

CBP also has the largest and most diverse law enforcement canine program in the country. Specially trained detector dogs are used to interdict illegal narcotics, smuggled humans, explosives, prohibited agricultural products, and unreported currency at and around our nation's ports of entry.

Last modified: 
February 9, 2017