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  4. CBP urges commercial traffic requiring Port of Seattle access to expect delays, plan alternate routes during viaduct closure

CBP urges commercial traffic requiring Port of Seattle access to expect delays, plan alternate routes during viaduct closure

Release Date

SEATTLE – With the closure of the Alaskan Way viaduct beginning Friday, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is urging commercial traffic that requires access to the Port of Seattle to expect delays and to plan ahead to take alternate routes or travel at non-peak times.

Customs and Border Protection is urging commercial traffic requiring access to the Port of Seattle to expect delays and plan alternate routes during the closure of the Alaskan Way viaduct.

Customs and Border Protection is urging commercial traffic requiring access to the Port of Seattle to expect delays and plan alternate routes during the closure of the Alaskan Way viaduct.

“CBP is aware that there may be delays in port access due to the closure of the viaduct,” said Michele James, Director, Field Operations Seattle. “We are working on mitigation strategies and will work closely with our trade partners to help alleviate traffic congestion and facilitate legitimate trade.”  

CBP does not anticipate any interruption in operations at the port, but does expect heavy surface street congestion in the area of the port during the approximately two-week closure of the viaduct. Drivers requiring access to the port are encouraged to visit www.99closure.org for more information.

Please visit www.cbp.gov to view additional news releases and other information pertaining to Customs and Border Protection.

Last Modified: February 3, 2021