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CBP San Juan Seizes Counterfeit Barbie Dolls Along with High-Lead Content Toy Cars and Footballs

Release Date: 
January 25, 2013

 

CBP officers and U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) investigators targeted five shipments containing children's toys such as R/C cars, motorcycles, footballs, friction cars and bicycles, and kitchen play sets on suspicion that the toys contained dangerous levels of lead.

CBP officers and U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) investigators targeted five shipments containing children's toys such as R/C cars, motorcycles, footballs, friction cars and bicycles, and kitchen play sets on suspicion that the toys contained dangerous levels of lead.

SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO—Numerous imports arrived at the San Juan seaport between October and December 2012. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers and import specialists began targeting shipments that were coming into Puerto Rico looking for unsafe and counterfeit items.

Specifically, CBP officers seized a shipment that contained fake Barbie dolls for trademark violation. It had an estimated domestic value of $99,552.

Further, CBP officers and U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) investigators targeted five shipments containing children's toys such as R/C cars, motorcycles, footballs, friction cars and bicycles, and kitchen play sets on suspicion that the toys contained dangerous levels of lead. Testing conducted at CPSC's National Product Testing and Evaluation Center found excessive levels of lead on all of the toys. CBP in Puerto Rico made about six seizures for trademark violation and for violating the federal lead-paint standard. The total domestic value for all of these seizures was about $651,950.

"Collaboration with trademark holders and CPSC allows our trade enforcement officers and import specialists to have an enhanced capacity to stop unsafe and counterfeit products," stated Marcelino Borges, Director of Field Operations for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

 

Testing conducted at CPSC's National Product Testing and Evaluation Center found excessive levels of lead on all of the toys. CBP in Puerto Rico made about six seizures for trademark violation and for violating the federal lead-paint standard.

Testing conducted at CPSC's National Product Testing and Evaluation Center found excessive levels of lead on all of the toys. CBP in Puerto Rico made about six seizures for trademark violation and for violating the federal lead-paint standard.

CBP facilitates about $2 trillion dollars in legitimate trade while enforcing U.S. trade laws that protect the economy, the health and the safety of the American people. This was accomplished through close partnerships with the trade community and other government agencies.

Within the last four years CBP and CPSC have seized nationwide more than 8.5 million units of hazardous toys and children's products. Over the last two years, the combined efforts of CBP and CPSC in Puerto Rico have resulted in the seizure of thousands of unsafe and counterfeit children's merchandise. As a result, CBP is not only focused on enforcing the rights of intellectual property right holders, but along with CPSC, we are also focused on keeping unsafe products off store shelves and out of consumers' homes.

Last modified: 
February 9, 2017