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CBP Officers in Lukeville Seize Marijuana

Release Date: 
January 10, 2011

Lukeville, Ariz. - U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers at the Lukeville port of entry made two separate marijuana seizures over the weekend, totaling more than 500 pounds.

Marijuana discovered in auxiliary fuel tank.

On Jan. 7, at approximately 2:00 p.m., CBP officers encountered a 32-year-old male resident of San Luis, Ariz., driving a 2001 Ford F-250 truck. A CBP officer referred him to a secondary inspection. Upon closer examination of the vehicle and a positive alert by a narcotic detector dog, officers noticed anomalies inside the fuel tank. After emptying the fuel, a total of 22 packages were removed, weighing 314.57 pounds. The drugs seized are valued at $266,830. The man was turned over to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) for further investigation.

On Jan. 8, at approximately 4:30 p.m., CBP officers encountered a 35-year-old female resident of Puerto Penasco, Mexico, driving a 1998 Ford F-150 truck. A CBP officer referred her to a secondary inspection. Upon closer examination of the vehicle and a positive alert by a narcotic detector dog, noticed anomalies inside the fuel tank.

When the tank was removed, officers removed three metal boxes which contained 14 packages of what was determined to be marijuana, weighing 187.57 pounds. The drugs seized are valued at $159,099. The woman was turned over to Immigration and Customs Enforcement for further investigation.

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While anti-terrorism is the primary mission of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the inspection process at the ports of entry associated with this mission results in impressive numbers of enforcement actions in all categories.

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Last modified: 
February 9, 2017