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Lapse in Federal Funding Impact on CBP Website Operations Notice

NOTICE: Due to the lapse in federal funding, this website will not be actively managed. This website was last updated on December 21, 2018 and will not be updated until after funding is enacted. As such, information on this website may not be up to date. Transactions submitted via this website might not be processed and we will not be able to respond to inquiries until after appropriations are enacted.

 

Aviso del impacto de la interrupción de fondos federales en las operaciones del sitio web del Oficina de Aduanas y Protección Fronteriza de los Estados Unidos (CBP, por sus siglas en inglés)

AVISO:  A causa de la interrupción de fondos federales, este sitio de web no será administrado activamente. La última actualización a este sitio web se realizó el 21 de diciembre de 2018 y no se harán más actualizaciones hasta que el gobierno reanude operaciones; por ende, puede que el sitio web no refleje la información más reciente. Es posible que no podamos procesar transacciones ni responder a
preguntas hasta que se reanuden operaciones.

CBP Officers and Agriculture Specialists Ensure Valentine’s Day Bouquets are Free from Pests and Disease

Release Date: 
February 12, 2018

SAN DIEGO - With Valentine’s Day celebrations around the corner, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers and agriculture specialists working at U.S. ports of entry are busy making sure that flower imports are free from insects, pests and diseases that could harm the agricultural and floral industries of the United States.

"Travelers need to declare all items acquired in a foreign country to the CBP officer upon entry to the United States," said San Diego Director of Field Operations for CBP, Pete Flores. "It is an important part of the CBP mission to identify and stop pests and diseases at the border before they can be spread elsewhere."

Chrysanthemums and orange jasmine from Mexico are prohibited through the passenger ports of entry. Travelers cannot bring arrangements with these flowers into the country through a passenger port of entry. Those specific items are subject to confiscation.

With the current restrictions, CBP is trying to prevent funguses, such as “Chrysanthemum White Rust” from entering the U.S. Additionally, some cut greenery, which are the plants used to fill a bouquet, may have pests or diseases. For example, Murraya (common name “orange jasmine”) is a host for Asian citrus psyllid, a dangerous pest of citrus. If any portion of a bouquet has pests, the entire bouquet will be confiscated.

Roses, carnations, and most other flowers are allowed into the U.S. after they pass inspection. However, plants potted in soil cannot be brought from Mexico. Travelers must declare all flowers and plants to CBP officers.

If a traveler declares a bouquet with prohibited plants, it will be seized, but travelers can avoid possible penalties by ensuring that they declare the items. After a traveler declares a bouquet with no prohibited items, CBP agriculture specialists will inspect cut flowers and plants for any sign of insects, pests or diseases.

Last modified: 
February 13, 2018