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CBP Enforcement Activity Identifies 29 Fugitives Including Man Wanted for Aggravated Sexual Assault of a Child

Release Date: 
August 19, 2011

El Paso, Texas - U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers working at ports of entry in El Paso, West Texas, and New Mexico identified 138 violations during the past week. CBP officers apprehended fugitives, identified immigration violations, seized drugs, and confiscated prohibited agriculture items during the last seven days.

CBP officers working at area ports identified 29 fugitives during the previous week including one man who was wanted in Houston on aggravated sexual assault on a child charges. The arrest was made Aug. 14 at the Paso Del Norte pedestrian crossing when 55-year-old Lucio Reyes Alvarez was identified as a wanted subject, as CBP officers processed his entry document. CBP officers confirmed the warrant and took custody of the subject without incident. He was turned over to the El Paso Police Department and booked into the El Paso County Jail where he is currently detained.

"The CBP inspection process routinely results in fugitives being identified and apprehended," said CBP El Paso Director of Field Operations Ana B. Hinojosa. "El Paso is recognized as one of the safest large cities in the U.S. and we believe that the work being done by CBP personnel at area ports of entry have helped the city achieve that notable rank. In this case specifically, our officers prevented a person wanted for being a sexual predator against children, from being able to enter our city and our neighborhoods."

In addition to the sexual assault on a child suspect, CBP officers working at area ports took custody of an additional 28 fugitives being sought on a wide variety of charges.

During the previous seven days, area CBP officers uncovered 79 immigration violations. Intended immigrants made up the largest group of violators. A total of 34 were identified through thorough document exams. In these cases, individuals will use a legally issued border-crossing card (laser visa) to live or work in the United States, which is not authorized. Violators generally lose their documents and are returned to Mexico.

CBP officers also identified a total of 20 impostors during the three-day period. Imposters with previous criminal histories are generally booked into the El Paso County jail to face federal prosecution. Imposters are also removed from the United States for a minimum five-year period and face federal felony charges if they attempt to illegally reenter the country again.

"Some of these cases involve felons who have been previously removed from the country and are barred from legal reentry," said Hinojosa. "CBP officers are stopping these dangerous people in their tracks. This is an important part of our mission of protecting the homeland, the United States of America."

The balance of the immigration violators included those making false claims to U.S. citizenship, people attempting to enter with counterfeit or altered documents, visa overstay violations and people who had entered the country without inspection.

Area CBP officers made 12 seizures of prohibited food and agricultural items this week, resulting in $2,525 in fines being assessed. Prohibited items seized this week included bologna, chorizo, apples, oranges, mangoes, pears, plums, peaches, guavas, pomegranates, apricots, avocados and live plants.

A total of 596 pounds of marijuana was seized in 12 incidents during the time period. CBP officers this weekend also identified three export violations, made two commercial seizures, and one steroid bust during the previous week. While anti-terrorism is the primary mission of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the inspection process at the ports of entry associated with this mission results in impressive numbers of enforcement actions in all categories.

Last modified: 
February 9, 2017