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Border Patrol Agents Rescue Mexican National on Lake Amistad

Release Date: 
February 26, 2016

DEL RIO, Texas U.S. Border Patrol agents assigned to the Lake Task Force unit, rescued a male undocumented immigrant clinging to a marker buoy in the middle of Lake Amistad.

Lake Task Force Border Patrol agents, conducting maritime operations along Lake Amistad, encountered a male subject clinging to a buoy in the middle of the lake.

Lake Task Force Border Patrol agents, conducting maritime operations along Lake Amistad, encountered a male subject clinging to a buoy in the middle of the lake.

“The outcome could have ended tragically had the agents not seen the individual," said Del Rio Sector Chief Rodolfo Karisch. "I am proud of selfless acts our agents perform on a daily basis."

On Feb. 25, at approximately 10:30 a.m., Lake Task Force Border Patrol agents, conducting maritime operations along Lake Amistad, encountered a male subject clinging to a buoy in the middle of the lake. The individual had become fatigued and cold as he attempted to swim his way back to Mexico from the United States side of the lake. The agents quickly pulled the individual to the safety of the vessel. Upon further investigation the subject was determined to be a Mexican national illegally present in the United States.  

The 36-year-old Mexican national was not injured throughout his ordeal and was determined to be in good health after an evaluation by a Border Patrol agent emergency medical technician.

The Mexican national will be processed as per Del Rio Sector guidelines. 

The Del Rio Border Patrol Sector is part of the Joint Task Force-West South Texas Corridor, which leverages federal, state and local resources to combat transnational criminal organizations. To report suspicious activity call the Del Rio Sector’s toll free number at 1-866-511-8727.

Last modified: 
February 9, 2017