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Baltimore CBP Intercepts First Dorytomus longimanus Weevil

Release Date: 
April 5, 2011

Baltimore - Customs and Border Protection agriculture specialists discovered a Dorytomus longimanus, a type of weevil, Wednesday that a U.S. Department of Agriculture entomologist confirmed Monday was a first such discovery in the Port of Baltimore.

A Dorytomus longimanus that Customs and Border Protection agriculture specialists discovered March 30, 2011 in a shipping container of Italian ceramic tiles was confirmed April 4, 2011 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture pest database to be a first such discovery in Baltimore. (CBP Photo/Handout)

A Dorytomus longimanus that Customs and Border Protection agriculture specialists discovered March 30, 2011 in a shipping container of Italian ceramic tiles was confirmed April 4, 2011 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture pest database to be a first such discovery in Baltimore. (CBP Photo/Handout)

Agriculture specialists also intercepted a Camptopus seed bug, which hasn't been intercepted in the port of Baltimore since December 1990. Both insect pests, indigenous to Europe, pose a threat to American crop and seed plants. They arrived in containers of Italian ceramic tile.

"CBP agriculture specialists take very serious their mission of protecting American agriculture and each pest interception emphasizes the importance of their efforts," said CBP Baltimore Port Director Ricardo Scheller. "I am pleased to say that Baltimore employs some of our agency's best at discovering and mitigating potential threats posed by these new insect interceptions."

CBP agriculture specialists also discovered an Oulema leaf beetle, Xerotricha conspurcata snails and Helicellinae snails in additional containers of Italian ceramic tiles.

CBP issued Emergency Action Notifications and ordered the importers to fumigate the containers.

CBP agriculture specialists have extensive training and experience in the biological sciences and agricultural inspection. On a typical day, they inspect tens of thousands of international air passengers, and air and sea cargoes nationally being imported to the United States and seize 4,291 prohibited meat, plant materials or animal products, including 454 insect pests.

Last modified: 
February 9, 2017