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Baltimore CBP Arrests Jamaican Woman for Allegedly Smuggling Cocaine Internally

Release Date: 
November 18, 2015

BALTIMORE -- U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers arrested a Jamaican woman for allegedly smuggling more than four ounces of cocaine inside her body to Baltimore Washington International Airport on November 11.

CBP officers referred Camella Simone Whyte, 31, to a routine secondary examination after she arrived from Montego Bay, Jamaica. Whyte consented to a medical examination during questioning, and that medical exam revealed the presence of foreign objects inside her body. Whyte was induced and she passed 10 thumb-sized pellets. The pellets contained a white, powdery substance that field-tested positive for cocaine. The pellet’s total weighed measured about 120 grams or 4.2 ounces.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers arrested Jamaican woman Camella Simone Whyte, 31, for allegedly smuggling cocaine into Baltimore Washington International Airport on November 11, 2015.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers arrested Jamaican woman Camella Simone Whyte, 31, for allegedly smuggling cocaine into Baltimore Washington International Airport on November 11, 2015.

CBP paroled Whyte into the U.S. so that she can be prosecuted by the Anne Arundel County, Md., State’s Attorney’s Office.

“Smuggling narcotics inside one’s body is dangerous. If a pellet breaches inside a courier, the result could be a very painful death,” said Dianna Bowman, CBP’s Area Port Director for the Port of Baltimore. “Narcotics interdiction remains an enforcement priority for Customs and Border Protection, and a mission that we take very seriously.”

On a typical day, CBP seizes 10,327 pounds of drugs at and between our nation’s 328 ports of entry. In addition to narcotics enforcement, CBP routinely conducts inspection operations on arriving and departing international flights and intercepts currency, weapons, prohibited agriculture products, and other illicit items.

View additional enforcement priorities and stats at CBP Snapshot. Learn more about CBP.

Criminal charges are merely allegations.  Defendants are presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty in a court of law.

CBP issued a detainer on Whyte to be returned to CBP upon adjudication of her charges to complete her admissions inspection.

Last modified: 
February 9, 2017