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Applying for Admission into United States

 

Q: How does the Inspection Process work?
A: All persons arriving at a port-of-entry to the United States are subject to inspection by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers.  CBP officers will conduct the Immigration, Customs and Agriculture components of the Inspections process.. Additional information regarding the inspection process is located in the Code of Federal Regulations, see, e.g. 8 CFR 235 Inspection of Persons Applying for Admission.
Q: Will I be able to travel into or through the United States?
A:

Aliens seeking to lawfully enter into the United States must establish their admissibility to the satisfaction of the CBP officer. This is done as part of the inspection process. The reasons that a traveler who is applying for admission into the United States could be inadmissible are found in INA § 212(a)

Q: What procedures apply in considering the health-related grounds of inadmissibility?
A: Under INA § 212(a)(1)(A), aliens seeking to travel into the United States who have certain health-related issues may be inadmissible. Should it be necessary, a physical and/or mental examination of an applicant for admission should be conducted by a panel physician. When CBP officers encounter an alien at a port of entry who may be inadmissible under public health grounds, the CBP officer may refer the alien to a panel physician. In those circumstances, the CBP officer will provide the alien with the list of panel physicians. In that case, the alien will have to go to one of the panel physicians for an evaluation before again presenting themselves for admission. The panel physician will notify CBP of the results of the examination, so that CBP can make an admissibility determination.

The panel physician evaluation is valid for only one year. Thus, even if you have previously had such an evaluation, if it has been more than a year since the examination was conducted, a new examination will likely be necessary.

Q: What if I have questions about whether I will be deemed admissible?
A: Before you travel, if you have any concerns about your admissibility, you should seek legal counsel. CBP cannot provide legal advice to members of the public.
Q: What will happen if I am not found admissible?
A: If you are determined to be inadmissible you could, in certain circumstances, be placed into removal proceedings. In some circumstances an officer may, in his or her sole discretion, determine to permit you to withdraw your application for admission. A determination of inadmissibility may have an impact on your future admissibility and may result in the cancellation of your visa, if you have one.